STEP 10 WORK WITH THE SCHOOL


We finally made it to STEP 10 – 10 STEPS TO READING SUCCESS FOR PROGRESSIVE PARENTS PROMOTING LITERACY.

Since September, I have shared research based, time tested literacy strategies and information.

10 Steps to Reading Success. Over the years, I have tweaked the steps and helped parents and caring adults to implement them. If the steps are used consistently, they work.

But first, let’s take a quick look back at the steps that have been shared so far.

STEP 1- READ READ READ

STEP 2 READ WITH YOUR CHILD EVERY DAY

STEP 3 MAINTAIN A PRINT RICH ENVIRONMENT

STEP 4 BUILD STAMINA

STEP 5 VISIT THE LIBRARY

STEP 6 JOIN OR START A BOOK CLUB

STEP 7 START A READING CENTER IN YOUR LOCAL COMMUNITY

STEP 8 RECOGNIZE PRINT EVERYWHERE

STEP 9 DISCOVER YOUR CHILD’S INTERESTS

Read the past blog posts for detailed information about each step.

Now for the moment you have all been waiting for.

Step 10 – Work with the school

We can all agree that when parents partner with schools and advocate for children, we lay the ground work for our children to be successful.

Even if you are home schooling your child, please understand – that positive collaboration with the school is key. Let me know if you would like more information on this topic.

One thing for sure:

“PARENT INVOLVEMENT IN EDUCATION IS CRUCIAL. NO MATTER THEIR INCOME OR BACKGROUND, STUDENTS WITH INVOLVED PARENTS ARE MORE LIKELY TO HAVE HIGHER GRADES AND TEST SCORES, ATTEND SCHOOL REGULARLY, HAVE BETTER SOCIAL SKILLS, SHOW IMPROVED BEHAVIOR, AND ADAPT WELL TO SCHOOL.”

NATIONAL COALITION FOR PARENT INVOLVEMENT IN EDUCATION. 2006. RESEARCH REVIEW AND RESOURCES. RETRIEVED SEPTEMBER 16, 2011, FROM WWW.NCPIE.ORG/WHATSHAPPENING/RESEARCHJANUARY2006.CFM

TIP #1

Starting at the very beginning of the school year or at the beginning of each semester, write a note to the teacher introducing yourself and your child. Let the teacher know that you are willing to maintain open channels of communication and that you are ready to support your child and reinforce learning at home. Make sure your child is reading level is progressing. If your child is experiencing challenges in reading, find out what supports are in place at the school. Find out what you can do to help. Find out how your child can be more involved in their own growth. Periodically, reach out to the teacher to check on your child. Don’t wait until progress reports or report cards are due.

Let me share a funny story. Well, I hope it’s funny to you.

There is a large age gap between my sons. When the older one was in school, it was before the wide spread use of the internet. I was the parent who called and wrote notes on a regular basis. I wasn’t a pest, but I was a teacher myself and I knew how important it was to maintain contact with the teacher. When my younger son came along, the internet was in full effect. I was the email queen. One day he asked me “DID YOU CONSTANTLY EMAIL THE TEACHERS WHEN MY BROTHER WAS IN SCHOOL?” I said no, but I called and wrote notes all the time.

Remember, your child’s teacher is always the first point of contact. But if you have an issue that isn’t resolved, don’t be afraid to reach out to the school administrator.

TIP #2

Create a comfortable environment for your child to complete homework assignments and projects. That may mean you have to de-clutter. It’s ok, you can do it.

TIP #3

Every evening talk with your child and ask open ended questions about their day at school. By open ended, I mean A question that will require your child to answer in a complete sentence.

For instance, If you ask “How was school today?” They could just respond “FINE”

Consider asking:

“What was your favorite part about school today?” or

“What made you laugh today?” or

“Tell me something good that happened today?” or even

“What made you feel sad today?”

“Tell me something new that you learned today.”

These types of questions and statements can help you keep your pulse on how you child feels about their experience at school. Their response or lack thereof may mean that you need to reach out to the teacher.

TIP #4

When the teacher schedules a conference, emails or calls you, respond as soon as possible. Within 24 hours is best. And the same thing applies when you call or email the teacher. Expect a response in 24 hours.

TIP #5

Volunteer in your child’s school. Be a class parent. Bake or buy cookies for a school event, join the PTA or PTO. If the school doesn’t have one, seek out other parents, reach out to the administration and start one.

For more information about any of the 10 STEPS, leave a comment below or fill out the contact form.

https:// www.kpcarterwrites.com/contact

Share your thoughts on how you maintain open communication with your child’s school in the comment box below.

Next week’s MONDAY MOTIVATION will focus on keeping your child engaged over the holiday break.

I wish you love, laughter and, literacy!

In honor of the children,

Kathy Carter

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